April 12, 2021

Macro Series

Focus – The effects of climate change on productivity

BY Silja Sepping, John Llewellyn

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( < 1 min)
  • Global warming stands to have quantitatively important effects on country productivity
  • While most countries will apparently be affected negatively , some may see large gains
  • Canada and Russia could see considerable increases in productivity
  • India by contrast is set to be hit extremely hard; and the US too will incur losses
  • The geopolitical consequences of these developments stand to be huge
Macro series – Focus – The effects of climate change on productivity – April 2021

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Focus – The effects of climate change on productivity

( < 1 min) Global warming stands to have quantitatively important effects on country productivity While most countries will apparently be affected negatively , some may see large gains Canada and Russia could see considerable increases in productivity India

Read More »

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