Gabriel Wildau

Gabriel Wildau is a political risk analyst on China. He was previously Shanghai Bureau Chief for the Financial Times, where he covered China’s macro-economy, financial system, and markets.

Background

Gabriel Wildau is a Senior Vice President focusing on political risk analysis in China. He was previously Shanghai Bureau Chief for the Financial Times, where he covered China’s macro-economy, financial system, and markets.

Prior to the Financial Times, Gabriel served as the China Finance Correspondent and Markets Correspondent for Reuters, where he wrote daily reports on China’s interbank foreign exchange and money markets. He also worked as a research analyst for SK Group China and as the Beijing bureau chief for GaveKal-Dragonomics, a macro-economic consultancy. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University and is fluent in Mandarin.

ASIA: Weekly politics update

( 6 mins) Below is the weekly update of political developments across East Asia. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you want to discuss any of the countries mentioned in more detail. CHINA: High-level rebuke of

Read More »

ASIA: Weekly politics update

( 6 mins) Below is the weekly update of political developments across East Asia. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you want to discuss any of the countries mentioned in more detail. CHINA: High-level rebuke of

Read More »

ASIA: Weekly politics update

( 5 mins) Below is the weekly update of political developments across East Asia. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you want to discuss any of the countries mentioned in more detail. US/CHINA: China’s top diplomat

Read More »

ASIA: Weekly politics update

( 7 mins) Below is the weekly update of political developments across East Asia. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you want to discuss any of the countries mentioned in more detail. CHINA: Signs of monetary

Read More »

So from what I understand from all the policymakers in the US, Boeing is NOT an example of civil military fusion and the US has never engaged in it. When China buys from Boeing, it is NOT funding military R&D because there are no dual use applications in aerospace.

For any analyst or scholar who focuses on U.S.-China relations, accusations that one is a “useful idiot” or “Chinese spy”—or perhaps promotes a “CCP narrative” can be a frequent occurrence. None of this is at all unique to me, nor am I even close to experiencing the worst of it.

Given the history of what happened to the Asia policy community after the US “lost” China in 1949, we should be particularly leery of groupthink and ostracizing critical perspectives.

@kevtellier What’s funny about China is that the people know what they are being told is propaganda while in the US, they think because it is privately owned, it’s not propaganda lol.

"the most detailed and reliable analysis of its ownership to date concludes that Huawei’s employee ownership is genuine...would make it the second-largest majority employee-owned company in the world, just after (supermarket chain) Publix in the US" https://www.nceo.org/employee-ownership-blog/huaweis-phantom-plan-provides-real-ownership-90000-employees

Important point about the reasons that Beijing halted Ant Group's IPO halt. I would add that the role of Jiang Zemin's grandson as an investor in Ant was public knowledge, not something that CCP discovered recently through an "investigation." https://www.reuters.com/article/us-boyu-capital-fundraising/chinese-private-equity-firm-boyu-closes-largest-fund-yet-with-3-6-billion-sources-idUSKCN1QP0E2

LFC@goldencaskcap

@petesweeneypro Indeed to think IPO was halted mainly bc he wants to stop his rivals from getting even richer would require one to completely ignore the vast web of investments these firms also have and the absolute bull mkt in mainland/HK that is printing billionaires daily...

For the love of God, eliminate the words "linked to" from your China reporting and analysis.

If you write that two entities are "connected" but don't specify how (or link to a resource that does), you are doing a massive disservice to yourself and your readers.

How can the Biden administration credibly criticize China for repressing free speech and government transparency while also prosecuting the world's most influential advocate for these same values? https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/12/us/politics/julian-assange-case-justice-department.html

Load More...